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comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE
By Juliet Kahn
I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.
And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.
Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.
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comicsalliance:

THE UNCERTAINTY OF CHANGE: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE ‘LEGEND OF KORRA’ BOOK 3 FINALE

By Juliet Kahn

I re-watched “Sozin’s Comet” last night, in the wake of The Legend of Korra’s third season finale. It was still wonderful, still grand and gorgeous and heavy with emotion. But it felt different this time. It felt…funnier.

And really, it is. Avatar: The Last Airbender‘s four-episode finale starts with a beach party. Sokka cracks jokes as he scrambles across a crumbling airship. The last spoken line is a blind joke. It is clear to me, in a way that it wasn’t when I first watched it, that these characters are young teens. Young teens dealing with genocidal dictatorships, Orwellian city-states and the general mayhem of war, absolutely, but their age lends the whole affair a constant, underlying levity. The adults that exist are kept at arm’s length from the action—present, but unmistakably marked as “grown-ups,” and thus distant. Youth, and all its connotations of hope and humor, are the engine of the show.

Legend of Korra, in contrast, is downright grim. The central team all falls between 17 and 20 years old, and 50-somethings like Lin and Tenzin are as present in the story as they are. Their relationships feel less timid, less blushy. Characters like Mako have solid careers and murky pasts involving gang membership. Azula was a terrifying and tragic villain, but baddies like Zaheer (and Amon, and Unalaq) wield philosophical weight alongside their grinning evil.

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(via linbeifong)

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submissive-baby-girl:

vittyyluvscookies:

unsolicited disney

Gaston is suddenly not scary anymore.

(via theparonomasiac)

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ladyfandom:

consulting-loki:

mayebay3:

so-treu:

mpreg-tony:

uncontrollablyspooky:

I PHYSICALLY CAN’T NOT REBLOG THIS WHEN IT COMES UP ON MY DASH
IT’S TOO COOL

It’s called Winterguard. It’s a sport. Those girls are marching band color-guard girls during the summer touring season, and during the winter they compete against other color-guard teams to music. Costumes, props, mats, everything has to be carried onto the gym floor and then taken back away and counts as part of your performance time. 
So when Family Guy or other popular media makes fun of color-guard girls, it pisses me off. We are not rejected cheerleaders. We are what you see above. We kick ass. We spin rifles and flags and sabers. 

ok that’s pretty badass.


side note: fucking hot


Oh my god finally some guard appreciation. This was my life for 10 years and most people don’t even know what it is.

ladyfandom:

consulting-loki:

mayebay3:

so-treu:

mpreg-tony:

uncontrollablyspooky:

I PHYSICALLY CAN’T NOT REBLOG THIS WHEN IT COMES UP ON MY DASH

IT’S TOO COOL

It’s called Winterguard. It’s a sport. Those girls are marching band color-guard girls during the summer touring season, and during the winter they compete against other color-guard teams to music. Costumes, props, mats, everything has to be carried onto the gym floor and then taken back away and counts as part of your performance time. 

So when Family Guy or other popular media makes fun of color-guard girls, it pisses me off. We are not rejected cheerleaders. We are what you see above. We kick ass. We spin rifles and flags and sabers. 

ok that’s pretty badass.

side note: fucking hot

Oh my god finally some guard appreciation. This was my life for 10 years and most people don’t even know what it is.

(Source: iwhaleventually, via somervta)

Tags: woah
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(Source: studygeek, via bloodredorion)

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Text

So I’m looking through someone’s facebook profile photos, and I see the letters “q” and “t” together everywhere, in the caption and comments. And I’m confused. What is this “qt”?

QuickTime?

The software platform?

Quentin Tarantino?

Only then do I realize.

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meteorstiles:

Today on People Who Should Totally Cosplay as Korra: me

just say the word guys just give me a reason to do it nvm the fact that i’m nowhere near done with Toph the con is 12 DAYS AWAY

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desnascuffs101:

imsozarry:

OMG I KNOW WHY THEY ZOOMED IN KUVIRA LIKE SHE WAS SUCH AN IMPORTANT CHARACTER LOOK :O

she’s a love child!

AND THEY EVEN PLAYED SOME WEIRD MUSIC.

(via meteorstiles)

Tags: well shit lok
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"HAH! Hmm..well I guess Pascal’s not hiding out here."

(Source: imolaf, via tonystarksaslytherin)

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(via ginnabean)